Antifraud systems and security payments

The fake tickets website created to increase awareness of fraud in ticket sales deceived more than 1,500 people during the week

The fake tickets website created to increase awareness of fraud in ticket sales deceived more than 1,500 people during the week

The last investigations show that people increasingly began to use the secondary market for ticket sales, advertisements from individuals, social networks and other sources to purchase tickets for events, concerts and sports matches. Such user actions open huge opportunities for cyber-fraudsters.

Over the past three years, more than 21,000 people have been affected by fraudulent ticket sales sites in the UK, more than £ 17 million in monetary terms.

To increase awareness of fraudulent schemes on such sites, Action Fraud - the UK’s national reporting centre for fraud and cybercrime created a website for fake music tickets "Surfed Arts".

This website looked like an agent's ticketing site and completely imitating the way online scammers sell fake tickets. They used advertisements on social networks to inform the public about the sale of tickets for a concert of their favorite bands.

The ads were shown to fans of Adele in London, Ed Sheeran in Manchester and Bruno Mars in Leeds.

Fans who clicked on the link were redirected to the Surfed Arts website, where they immediately received a message that they could not buy tickets and advice on how to protect themselves and not become a victim of real scammers in the future.

Fraudulent sites like Surfed Arts do not have tickets for sale at all - buyers pay for services that will never be provided. And scammers disappear with victims money and, in best case scenario, send them fake tickets.

latest tweets